Orange County voters are buried under an avalanche of mailers all shouting that four-letter word: rent. Some claims are shocking. Along with images of handcuffs and money, shippers say offenders could be fined and jailed and politicians cannot be trusted to try to control rent prices. Rents in Central Florida have risen rapidly, as has public anger. A report commissioned by the Orange County government shows the number of unsubsidized rental units exceeds 132,000, but occupancy is 95% and the average rent per unit last year was nearly $1,700, an increase of 25% over the previous year. Commissioner Emily Bonilla says it’s time to put a cap on rent hikes. “So stop the bleeding right now. Give tenants stabilization and relief from their rising rents,” Bonilla said. This led to a 4-3 committee vote in August to put an order on the ballot. one year for more than 100,000 apartments. This ceiling would be slightly less than 10%, a figure linked to the increase in the consumer price index. Back to shippers now. Can a landlord really go to jail for breaking the ordinance? That’s a fact . As you scroll through the 14-page order, you will find “penalties for violation” which include a “fine not to exceed $500 or imprisonment in the county jail for a term not to exceed 60 days or the of them”. Then there is a claim of “special interest carve-outs.” This is a political twist. There are exceptions. They include seasonal and tourist units, including timeshares, luxury apartment buildings, “residential units located in a single family home, townhouse, condo or mobile home” and “units located in a disability facility, hospital, nursing home, and assisted care community. A third claim implies that the county has “a history of mismanaged housing funds.” This seems to be wrong. That may refer to an April memo from the Emergency Housing Assistance Program manager saying the county may have to return $2.5 million in unused federal money. But that never happened. According to an email from the mayor’s office, “the county has not returned any funds.” It’s no surprise that the Florida Realtors Association’s political arm, the Realtors Issues Mobilization Committee, is behind the senders. The group has raised $1.7 million in recent weeks and has already spent about half of that on a paper recycler’s dream to try to get you to vote no on the rent cap ordinance.

Orange County voters are buried under an avalanche of mailers all shouting that four-letter word: rent.

Some claims are shocking. Along with images of handcuffs and money, shippers say violators could be fined and jailed and politicians cannot be trusted to try to control rent prices.

Rents in Central Florida have risen rapidly, as has public anger.

Report commissioned by Orange County government shows number of unsubsidized rental units tops 132,000, but occupancy is 95% and average rent per unit last year was nearly of $1,700, an increase of 25% over the previous year.

Commissioner Emily Bonilla says it’s time to put the brakes on rent hikes.

“So stop the bleeding right now. Give tenants stabilization and relief from their rising rents,” Bonilla said.

This led to a 4-3 committee vote in August to put an order on the ballot. It would cap rent increases for a year for more than 100,000 apartments. This ceiling would be slightly less than 10%, a figure linked to the increase in the consumer price index.

Back to shippers now. Can a landlord really go to jail for breaking the ordinance? That’s a fact.

As you scroll through the 14-page order, you will find “penalties for violation” which include a “fine not to exceed $500 or imprisonment in the county jail for a term not to exceed 60 days or the of them”.

Then there is a claim of “special interest exclusions”. It’s political spin.

There are exceptions. They include seasonal and tourist units, including timeshares, luxury apartment buildings, “residential units located in a single family home, townhouse, condo or mobile home” and “units located in a disability facility, hospital, nursing home, and assisted care community. .”

A third claim implies that the county has “a history of mismanaged housing funds.” This seems to be wrong.

He may be referring to an April memo from the Emergency Rent Assistance Program manager saying the county may have to return $2.5 million in unused federal money.

But that never happened. According to an email from the mayor’s office, “the county has not refunded any funds.”

It’s no surprise that the political arm of the Florida Realtors Association, the Realtors Issues Mobilization Committee, is behind the shippers. The group has raised $1.7 million in recent weeks and has already spent about half of it on a paper recycler’s dream of trying to get you to vote no on the rent cap ordinance.

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